Science & Research

/Science & Research
8 04, 2019

Take the City Nature Challenge!

2019-03-28T19:58:33-07:00April 8th, 2019|Categories: Announcements, Blog, Community Conservation, Science & Research|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Happy spring! Gather your family, friends, and CalNat cohort and contribute your iNaturalist observation skills to your local community organizations and help collect data for science! April 26-29 City Nature Challenge: The City Nature Challenge began as a nature-observation competition between the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County in 2016, organized around simple charge: “which city can find the most nature?” Since then, the competition has expanded rapidly, and this year more [...]

28 01, 2019

An Integrated Approach to Understanding Behavioral Responses of Free-Living Mammals to Human-Induced Rapid Change

2019-01-28T13:25:35-07:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Blog, Plants & Animals, Science & Research|Tags: , , , |

Dr. Jennifer E. Smith and her students received a grant from Save Mount Diablo's Mary Bowerman Science and Research Program in 2018. The grant, "An integrated approach to understanding behavioral responses of free-living mammals to human-induced rapid change," supported research addressing an an important issue in ecology, the ability for wildlife to cope with human-induced rapid environmental change. A team of five undergraduates quantified variation in behavioral responses of a [...]

28 01, 2019

Marsh Creek Volcanics

2019-01-28T13:19:53-07:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Blog, Science & Research|Tags: , , , |

Ryan Fay and Ray Sullivan received a Mary Bowerman Science and Research Program grant in 2018. Ryan Fay, Geologist at Albion Partners, presented their research on Marsh Creek volcanics at Save Mount Diablo's Mary Bowerman Science and Research Colloquium in December 2018. This research was an investigation about the intrusive history of volcanic units in the Marsh Creek and northern Diablo area. The purpose was to explain volcanic presence including time [...]

28 01, 2019

Predatory Behavior and Cyanide Resistance of Millipede-Hunting Beetles (Promecognathus) in the Diablo Range

2019-01-28T13:30:34-07:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Blog, Plants & Animals, Science & Research|Tags: , , , |

Brandt Weary, Entomologist, received a 2018 grant from Save Mount Diablo's Mary Bowerman Science and Research Program and presented his research at Save Mount Diablo's 5th Annual Mary Bowerman Science &  Research Colloquium in December 2018. Weary summarized his results as follows: Promecognathus ground beetles from the Diablo range specialize on hunting millipedes that are chemically defended with cyanide. These beetles utilize a unique hunting behavior to subdue their toxic [...]

11 12, 2018

Thanks for Attending the 5th Annual Mary Bowerman Science and Research Colloquium

2018-12-18T16:11:39-07:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Blog, Featured Content, Science & Research|

On Tuesday, December 4, Save Mount Diablo's 5th Annual Mary Bowerman Science and Research Colloquium was held at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA. (The Center's name honors the work of an extraordinary conservationist who was the first Executive Director of the Sierra Club and also did many other things on behalf of our environment.) The event was a huge success, full of captivating new information and discoveries presented [...]

15 04, 2018

Bioblitz 2018: Exploring Arroyo Del Cerro

2018-11-14T19:11:47-07:00April 15th, 2018|Categories: Blog, Plants & Animals, Science & Research|Tags: , , , , |

This year’s Bioblitz was the most highly attended SMD Bioblitz since 2007, with seventy-five biologists and expert naturalists compared to the usual thirty to forty naturalists of years past. Participants came from LSA, Nomad Ecology, Swaim Biological, UC Davis, UC Berkeley, the California Academy of Sciences, and the California Native Plant Society, among others, and donated their time over the weekend. Arroyo Del Cerro is home to the federally listed California red-legged frog and “has the potential for California tiger salamander,” said Malcolm Sproul. Other species were spotted as well, including the endemic Contra Costa manzanita. (Endemic means this species of manzanita only occurs in the area.) In total, 419 species were found, a high number that reflects the diverse habitat on the land.